Posted by Jingyu Shi, Partner Developer Advocate, Partner DevRel
This is the second in a series of blog posts in which outline strategies and guidance in Android with regard to power.
Notifications are a powerful channel you can use to keep your app's users connected and updated. Android provides Notification APIs to create and post notifications on the device, but quite often these notifications are triggered by external events and sent to your app from your app server.
In this blog post, we'll explain when and how to generate these remote notifications to provide timely updates to users and minimize battery drain.
Use FCM for remote notifications

We recommend using Firebase Cloud Messaging (FCM) to send remote notifications to Android devices. FCM is a free, cross-platform messaging solution that reliably delivers hundreds of billions of messages per day. It is primarily used to send remote notifications and to notify client applications that data is available to sync. If you still use Google Cloud Messaging (GCM) or the C2DM library , both of which are deprecated, it's time to upgrade to FCM!
There are two types of FCM messages you can choose from:


  • Notification Messages, which simplify notification handling and are high priority by default.
  • Data Messages, for when you want to handle the FCM messages within the client app.

You can set the priority to either high or normal on the data messages. You can find out more about FCM messages and message handling in this blog post on Firebase Blog.
FCM is optimized to work with Android power management features. Using the appropriate message priority and type helps you reach your users in a timely manner, and also helps save their battery. Learn more about power management features in this blog post: "Moar Power in P and the future".
To notify or not?

All of the notifications that you send should be well-structured and actionable, as well as provide timely and relevant information to your users. We recommend that you follow these notification guidelines, and avoid spamming your users. No one wants to be distracted by irrelevant or poorly-structured notifications. If your app behaves like this, your users may block the notifications or even uninstall your app.
The When not to use a notification section of the Material Design documentation for notifications highlights cases where you should not send your user a notification. For example, a common use case for a normal priority FCM Data Message is to tell the app when there's content ready for sync, which requires no user interaction. The sync should happen quietly in the background, with no need for a notification, and you can use the WorkManager1 or JobScheduler API to schedule the sync.
Post a notification first

If you are sending remote notifications, you should always post the notification as soon as possible upon receiving the FCM message. Adding any additional network requests before posting a notification will lead to delayed notifications for some of your users. When not handled properly, the notifications might not be seen at all, see the "avoid background service" section below.




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